science journalist and photographer Amelia Jaycen


Amelia Jaycen is a journalist covering physics, energy, materials, engineering and ocean technology.

You’ll find articles across the spectrum of Arctic research, climate change, energy, technology and more.


From the Seafloor to the Drugstore: Inventor Amy Wright on Marine Natural Products
Those were the glory days. Amy Wright would plop down into the seat inside a giant acrylic dome to be submerged
Read more.
X-Ray Vision: Berkeley’s High-Speed Electrons Fuel Atomic-Scale Science
BERKELEY, California—A group of eager writers attending the World Conference of Science Journalists 2017 stood on an upper platform at Berkeley’s Advanced Light
Read more.
Deep Dive into Engineering the World’s Most Advanced ROV System
In August 2017 a research group led by explorer and philanthropist Paul G. Allen used ultra-high-tech underwater equipment to locate
Read more.
From Dinosaurs to Data Networks: Texas and the Arctic in the Anthropocene
“Report from the Top of the World!” The flier caught my attention immediately. The U.S. Embassy in Oslo and the
Read more.
Robotic Telescopes Enable Advanced Antarctic Observations
Antarctica is more like interstellar space than any other place on earth. It is extremely cold‚ dry‚ calm‚ and extra dark with clear
Read more.
RUN Author Wins SPJ Mark of Excellence
Jaycen was awarded the Society of Professional Journalists Region 8 Mark of Excellence Non-Fiction Magazine Article category, announced Mar. 30. Her article “Mr. Universe.
Read more.
Mr. Universe. Lonely Hearts and Einstein in Love: The Personal Side of Science
Mr. Universe. Lonely Hearts and Einstein in Love: The Personal Side of Science is a feature-length profile of former New
Read more.
“You can’t breathe in air with 7,000 micrograms of sulfur dioxide.”
Russia’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Ecology on Tuesday told representatives of
Read more.
Advanced imagery brings new angle to wetlands research
UNT researchers use new technology to study wetland function, mitigate human impacts, milk the benefits of nature. (Research.unt.edu) Continue Reading
Read more.
Apollo 11 Astronaut Speaks about the Moon Landing and Why Space Matters Today
Collins: Keeping Earth in View Doesn’t Require a Spacecraft Earth Day 2019: This year marks the 50th anniversary of mankind’s
Read more.
Insects in Freezing Regions Have a Protein that Acts Like Antifreeze
From the Journal: Journal of Chemical Physics WASHINGTON, D.C., April 2, 2019 — The power to align water molecules is usually
Read more.
Coated optical fibers as opto-mechanical sensors
New model details Brillouin scattering interactions between light and sound waves in polyimide-coated fiber for detecting liquids outside the cladding
Read more.
Physicist Takes Cues from Artificial Intelligence
NEWPORT NEWS, VA –  In the world of computing, there’s a groundswell of excitement for what is perceived as the
Read more.
Virtual Immersion Goes Beyond the Surface with Underwater Drones
Christine Spiten is the 27 year old co-founder and chief global strategist of Blueye Robotics, a company making underwater drones that
Read more.
The Dawn of Gallium Oxide Microelectronics
WASHINGTON, D.C., February 6, 2018– Silicon has long been the go-to material in the world of microelectronics and semiconductor technology.
Read more.
Astronomy Team Brings Data to “Instrument: One Antarctic Night”
From discovering the rings of Supernova 1987A during his time at the European Southern Observatory (Garching‚ Germany) to pioneering supernova spectropolarimetry
Read more.
Data Processing: A Discovery Pipeline
The computer scientists working on INSTRUMENT: One Antarctic  Night view programming as an art form. They are also versed in the language of
Read more.
Data Sounds: The Music of Statistics
INSTRUMENT: One Antarctic Night is a suite of data instruments that use data from hundreds of thousands of stars captured by
Read more.
The Data Wranglers: Cataloging the Night Sky
INSTRUMENT: One Antarctic Night obtained more than one million data files and optical data images of the night sky over the
Read more.
The Father of Artificial Intelligence: Remembering Marvin Minsky
Marvin Minsky, computing pioneer, cognitive scientist, and a founding father of artificial intelligence known for his relentless ambition and forward
Read more.
Augmenting NASA’s Mars Simulation for the Health of Astronauts
Eight-thousand, two-hundred feet above sea level on the northern slope of Mauna Loa in a place surrounded by the barren, lava-rock
Read more.
Coding: The Creative Medium of Our Time
Ira Greenberg treats himself like a computer. His is the art + science of using coding as a paintbrush and exploring
Read more.
Art + Science. Cool! But what is it?
The intersection of art + science is not a place to which a map can be drawn. Its practitioners won’t
Read more.
The Most Pressing Problem in VR
If you’re following VR, you’re probably hearing a lot about presence. But what is it? The definition is elusive. Presence
Read more.
A Delicate Dance between East and West
This BBC report live from Kirkenes in the High North of Norway talks about Russia-NATO relations, hundreds of refugees on
Read more.
BBC’s Discovery Podcast Features Sonified Star Data
The soundtrack of the BBC World Service Discovery podcast episode “Sounds of Space: Deep Space” uses data from CSTAR telescopes
Read more.
The History Behind Texas Coal Power
ANDERSON — Straddling a dammed-up creek 20 miles east of College Station squats the Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station, a
Read more.
Embodied Information Behavior, Mixed Reality, and Big Data
Professor Ruth West, together with two students and a University of Tasmania collaborator, published in the proceedings of the SPIE,
Read more.
Landfill Gas and Biogas Symposium
The Landfill Gas and Biogas Symposium March 16-19, 2015 in New Orleans will give biomass managers a chance to assess
Read more.
Not a lot of thanks-giving after OPEC’s Nov. 27 meeting
End-of-year Company Update Dec. 2, 2014 — The world’s largest publicly traded energy company is weathering the storm of falling
Read more.
East-West Meets Far North
I lived in Kirkenes, Norway for five weeks this summer, and I could not put into words what it mean
Read more.